Don’t judge a book by its cover

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Most often people judge something or someone based on what they see on the outside, not the inside. Television and tabloids are very good at picking out the flaws of someone based on looks and actions; however, there is this one show named “The Voice” that focuses on talent.

“The Voice,” which first aired in 2011, gives individuals the chance to express themselves by their voice and not appearance. There are four celebrity coaches who are in the music business who are turned around in their chairs to avoid seeing the singer. The coaches are Blake Shelton, Gwen Stefani, Pharrell Williams, and Adam Levine. If the coach wants an individual on their team they will push their button to turn their chair around based on the person’s voice, not appearance.

This past season of “The Voice” featured an individual named Blessing Offor. Blessing is 25 years of age and has been completely blind since age nine. He was born with complete vision loss in his left eye, and at age nine he was shot in the right eye with a water gun, which detached the retina. Blessing said, “I was left with no vision, and had to figure out what God meant with this.”  In spite of this setback, he decided to go forward with his life goal which is to be able to play and write music no matter what has been going on in his life.

So he traveled to America from Nigeria to live with his uncle and pursue his dream. Blessing has played at the Kennedy Center in DC, seven or eight times. Prior to auditioning on “The Voice,” he released a 10-track album called “Guilty Pleasure” in 2010. Also in 2010, he was the recipient of an international young soloist award presented by VSA, an international organization based on arts and disabilities.

He wanted to audition on “The Voice” because he wants to prove that one can achieve one’s dream despite adversity. Although he did not win the voice, he inspires many of individuals who have disabilities.

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